Mother reveals her baby was nearly KILLED by the common group B strep bacteria

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Archie (left) and Evalene (right) were delivered in February this year, but Archie died at just four days old from GBS
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Archie Powell, a twin, died four days after birth

Archie and Evalene were delivered in February this year, but Archie died at just four days old from a GBS infection.

Their mother, Dawn, 41 who lives in Margate, Kent, had no risk factors. Already a mother to Kienna, 11, Aralyn, nine, and Lyara, seven, she’d never been told she carried strep B and had not had any problems in previous deliveries.

When she and her husband Kevin, 51, a self-employed salesman, discovered they were having twins and that one would be a boy, they were thrilled.

Archie was born first at 37 weeks, the larger twin at just over 6lb. Evalene followed, weighing just over 5lb. Both appeared healthy.

Archie (left) and Evalene (right) were delivered in February this year, but Archie died at just four days old from GBS

Minutes after birth, Dawn noticed Archie was grunting. Within hours, his blood sugar levels and temperature dropped. 

A consultant showed Dawn a blotchy area on Archie’s stomach and noticed he became irritated if this area was touched.

Archie was transferred to the Evelina Children’s Hospital two hours away in London. There, he had blood tests and a consultant sat Mrs Powell down. 

‘She told me Archie had strep B he’d contracted from me during delivery. No one really explained what it meant and I had no idea I could be a carrier as I was never tested.

‘It was a heart-breaking decision but we decided it was not fair to make Archie suffer. We decided to turn off the life support.’

Olive died of pneumonia and meningitis before birth

Olive, the daughter of Zoe Elly, 22 and Douglas McBain, died in the womb of GBS complications – just days before she was due to be born.

Ms Ely and Mr McBain, first-time parents from Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, were eagerly awaiting Olive’s arrival in June this year.

Ms Ely found out she had GBS while she was 31 weeks pregnant. She was tested because she was having stomach cramps, which could have been indicative of an early labour – a risk factor of GBS.

Zoe Ely, 22, and Douglas McBain, revealed their heartbreak after their baby died in the womb from GBS days before she was due to be born

Zoe Ely, 22, and Douglas McBain, revealed their heartbreak after their baby died in the womb from GBS days before she was due to be born 

But after finding out she had GBS, Ms Ely claims doctors told her there was nothing to worry about. 

If a pregnant woman is found to carry GBS, then she should be told that she will be offered intravenous antibiotics when she goes in to labour. 

The couple racked their brains for nine weeks over what went wrong before the post-mortem came back, revealing Olive had died of meningitis and pneumonia around two days before Ms Ely went into labour.

The case is extremely rare and ‘tragic’, charity Group B Strep Support said. 

Ms Ely said: ‘Hospitals and doctors think a baby won’t die from GBS in the womb but Olive is proof that they do. People need to know that.’ 

Roman Burns survived GBS sepsis

Roman Burns was rushed away as soon as he was born early at 27 weeks to mother, Abbey Burns, 25. 

The newborn, who weighed just 2lb 11oz (1.2kg), was born with group B strep, which caused him to develop sepsis.

Roman, from Colchester, also had a severe bleed on his brain which pressed on his brain tissue, which enlarged the ventricles that carry cerebral fluid.

Miss Burns said: ‘They sat us down and told us we had to prepare for the worst and Roman was most likely to die.’ 

Abbey Burns has shared photographs of her son Roman's first day of school after doctors warned he would unlikely survive

Abbey Burns has shared photographs of her son Roman’s first day of school after doctors warned he would unlikely survive

Roman (pictured as a baby) was born with a severe bleed on his brain, which has caused him to endure mobility problems

Roman (pictured left as a baby) was born with a severe bleed on his brain due to GBS, which has caused him to endure mobility problems

In total, the youngster spent three months in hospital before being discharged.

The bleed on his brain caused him to endure mobility problems, with the youngster requiring both physio and speech therapy. 

Four years on, Miss Burns, who is engaged to Roman’s father, Dean Burns, with the same surname, proudly watched her son start school in September.

She said: ‘He didn’t walk until he was just over two years old, he had physiotherapy every month, where they had to teach him how to crawl, teach him how to sit up, teach him how to walk.

‘The fact he can walk is amazing.’



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Archie Powell, a twin, died four days after birth

Archie and Evalene were delivered in February this year, but Archie died at just four days old from a GBS infection.

Their mother, Dawn, 41 who lives in Margate, Kent, had no risk factors. Already a mother to Kienna, 11, Aralyn, nine, and Lyara, seven, she’d never been told she carried strep B and had not had any problems in previous deliveries.

When she and her husband Kevin, 51, a self-employed salesman, discovered they were having twins and that one would be a boy, they were thrilled.

Archie was born first at 37 weeks, the larger twin at just over 6lb. Evalene followed, weighing just over 5lb. Both appeared healthy.

Archie (left) and Evalene (right) were delivered in February this year, but Archie died at just four days old from GBS

Minutes after birth, Dawn noticed Archie was grunting. Within hours, his blood sugar levels and temperature dropped. 

A consultant showed Dawn a blotchy area on Archie’s stomach and noticed he became irritated if this area was touched.

Archie was transferred to the Evelina Children’s Hospital two hours away in London. There, he had blood tests and a consultant sat Mrs Powell down. 

‘She told me Archie had strep B he’d contracted from me during delivery. No one really explained what it meant and I had no idea I could be a carrier as I was never tested.

‘It was a heart-breaking decision but we decided it was not fair to make Archie suffer. We decided to turn off the life support.’

Olive died of pneumonia and meningitis before birth

Olive, the daughter of Zoe Elly, 22 and Douglas McBain, died in the womb of GBS complications – just days before she was due to be born.

Ms Ely and Mr McBain, first-time parents from Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, were eagerly awaiting Olive’s arrival in June this year.

Ms Ely found out she had GBS while she was 31 weeks pregnant. She was tested because she was having stomach cramps, which could have been indicative of an early labour – a risk factor of GBS.

Zoe Ely, 22, and Douglas McBain, revealed their heartbreak after their baby died in the womb from GBS days before she was due to be born

Zoe Ely, 22, and Douglas McBain, revealed their heartbreak after their baby died in the womb from GBS days before she was due to be born 

But after finding out she had GBS, Ms Ely claims doctors told her there was nothing to worry about. 

If a pregnant woman is found to carry GBS, then she should be told that she will be offered intravenous antibiotics when she goes in to labour. 

The couple racked their brains for nine weeks over what went wrong before the post-mortem came back, revealing Olive had died of meningitis and pneumonia around two days before Ms Ely went into labour.

The case is extremely rare and ‘tragic’, charity Group B Strep Support said. 

Ms Ely said: ‘Hospitals and doctors think a baby won’t die from GBS in the womb but Olive is proof that they do. People need to know that.’ 

Roman Burns survived GBS sepsis

Roman Burns was rushed away as soon as he was born early at 27 weeks to mother, Abbey Burns, 25. 

The newborn, who weighed just 2lb 11oz (1.2kg), was born with group B strep, which caused him to develop sepsis.

Roman, from Colchester, also had a severe bleed on his brain which pressed on his brain tissue, which enlarged the ventricles that carry cerebral fluid.

Miss Burns said: ‘They sat us down and told us we had to prepare for the worst and Roman was most likely to die.’ 

Abbey Burns has shared photographs of her son Roman's first day of school after doctors warned he would unlikely survive

Abbey Burns has shared photographs of her son Roman’s first day of school after doctors warned he would unlikely survive

Roman (pictured as a baby) was born with a severe bleed on his brain, which has caused him to endure mobility problems

Roman (pictured left as a baby) was born with a severe bleed on his brain due to GBS, which has caused him to endure mobility problems

In total, the youngster spent three months in hospital before being discharged.

The bleed on his brain caused him to endure mobility problems, with the youngster requiring both physio and speech therapy. 

Four years on, Miss Burns, who is engaged to Roman’s father, Dean Burns, with the same surname, proudly watched her son start school in September.

She said: ‘He didn’t walk until he was just over two years old, he had physiotherapy every month, where they had to teach him how to crawl, teach him how to sit up, teach him how to walk.

‘The fact he can walk is amazing.’



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